Our military, civil rights and ebola

Sarah Smiley.jpeg

The military: Sacrificing personal freedoms for you
bangordailynews.com

I am a huge fan of Sarah Smiley’s writing. This particular article first appeared in the BDN on October 19, 2014.  Ms. Smiley writes and says what many of us have been thinking. Thanks, Sarah for this well written article.


The article begins like this:

— A school district in Washington state decided to remove swings sets from its playgrounds after the tragic death of a child. Never mind the thousands — no, millions — of children nationwide who get good old-fashioned, diabetes-fighting exercise on swing sets.— A school district in Nebraska urged teachers to quit using terms such as “boys and girls” and to try something less gender-oriented such as “purple penguins.” (Wait, are penguins purple? I thought they were black.)

— A nurse from Texas got on a plane, with the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention’s approval, for the Columbus Day weekend just days after having close contact with the first Ebola patient to die in the United States.

— And an NBC medical correspondent who was supposed to be in isolation for possible exposure to Ebola went out to get some soup. Because she was hungry.

In other news: from sports leagues all across the country — probably in a neighborhood near you — children get trophies just for showing up. Even when they lose.

I can’t think of a time when our “me culture” has become more blatantly obvious. After decades of handing out meaningless trophies, wrapping our youth in protective bubble wrap and making sure that not one single person ever hurts, suffers or loses some personal freedom, we’ve finally met our match: a disease that doesn’t care.

But if October’s news has you feeling as gloomy and defeated as it has made me, suddenly there was this: 4,000 U.S. troops, who are undoubtedly worried about a new, invisible opponent, are headed to Africa — because the government told them to go. And when they return, those troops will wait an extra 21 days in quarantine before they can be with their families. Yes, even if it’s a holiday weekend or they want soup.

People of the United States military: Still sacrificing their personal freedoms for you every single day“.    –    Please click HERE to read the entire article. It is well worth reading.


There, of course,  is more to this story. The other night, I saw this in the BDN: (click on links to read full articles)
Lawyer for Fort Kent nurse held on Ebola fears says she won’t abide by quarantine

and now this:
Nurse Kaci Hickox speaks at Fort Kent home, vows to fight 21-day isolation

This morning she is out for a bike ride. Helping in another country is a noble cause and I commend her for that. However, responsibility to her own country needs to be considered too. So she doesn’t show any symptoms at this time. HELLO – that is why the 21 day quarantine! This disease can take up to 21 days to show it’s ugly face.

If she won’t adhere to the quarantine, she is jeopardizing everyone that she comes in contact with – all because she feels that she has the right to do whatever she wants – rules and protocol be damned. Most of the folks in Aroostook County can’t afford a fancy lawyer to fight for their civil rights. What about their rights to expect this person to act responsibly and not jeopardize their well-being.

The government doesn’t know everything there is to know about the spread of this disease but I, for one, would rather that they are cautious until they figure it out. Perhaps someday they will decide that 21 days is not necessary but right now that is the protocol. Yet, this attention grabbing, whiny nurse says that staying home for 21 days is jeopardizing her civil rights. What ever happened to common sense?

To quote Ms. Smiley on our military returning: “And when they return, those troops will wait an extra 21 days in quarantine before they can be with their families. Yes, even if it’s a holiday weekend or they want soup.” After all, it is the responsible thing to do!!

Day 292…Blue Skies

Welcome to day 292 of  365 photos…the blue skies were spectacular today. It was one of those days where you could sit and gaze at the puffy white clouds rolling across the blue skies for hours. I went to Beaufort today to take photos for this post but by the time I wondered around taking photos and gazing at the clouds, it was too late to do those particular photos. Those will be tomorrow’s photos.

I hope that you enjoy seeing some of the clouds that I watched as they rolled across that pretty azure blue sky. Do you like sky gazing?

Day 292 - 365 Project - Blue SkiesCamera: Nikon D7100 – Lens: Tokina 12-280mm
Focal Length: 28mm – Aperture: f/4 – Shutter Speed: 1/1250  second – ISO: 100

I know that you will be surprised to see a shrimp boat in the next photo. *grin* Actually, if you follow this blog, you know that I find it hard to go anywhere without taking a photo of a shrimp boat. The sky was very spectacular above this boat and I couldn’t resist. Shrimp BoatGlad that you stopped by my self-project of a photo a day for 365 days. If this is your first time to my site and you wonder what this 365 days of photos is all about, click HERE to read the original post. Settings are added to the photos so that I can remember what I’ve used and can see if any future photos done with other settings turn out better or worse. Remember, this project is all about my learning more about photography.

Check out E-liz Treasures to see what my friend in Maine is doing with her daily photos.
Comments are always welcomed. I would love to hear from you.

Day 291…Pink Ribbon

Welcome to day 291 of  365 photos…I actually took this pink ribbon photo a while back but I took it so that I could post it for Breast Cancer Awareness month. Well, here it is October 28th and the month is almost over. I decided that today would be a good day to get it posted.  Doesn’t matter whether it is October or not –  please remember that early detection saves lives.  If you are over 50, don’t forget your annual mammogram. Have you had an annual mammogram?Day 291 - 365 Project - Pink Ribbon

Camera: Nikon D7100 – Lens: Tokina 12-28mm
Focal Length:12mm – Aperture: f/9 – Shutter Speed: 1/50  second – ISO: 100

Glad that you stopped by my self-project of a photo a day for 365 days. If this is your first time to my site and you wonder what this 365 days of photos is all about, click HERE to read the original post. Settings are added to the photos so that I can remember what I’ve used and can see if any future photos done with other settings turn out better or worse. Remember, this project is all about my learning more about photography.

Check out E-liz Treasures to see what my friend in Maine is doing with her daily photos.
Comments are always welcomed. I would love to hear from you.

Day 290…Speckled Trout

Welcome to day 290 of  365 photos…this gentleman caught a speckled trout yesterday while I was on the beach at the kite fest.  I happened to be standing at waters edge when I realized that he had a fish on the line. I am a novice at shooting video but I have a brandy new iPhone 6 so I grabbed it out of my pocket and started taking the video.  It turned out pretty good so I thought I would share it today (video will be after the stills). Taking a video is photography, right?? He ended up right in front of me and proudly held the trout up for me to see. I then asked him if he minded if I took one of him with my “real” camera. As you can see by that smile, he was fine with it. Day 290- 365 Project - Speckled TroutCamera: Nikon D7100 – Lens: Nikon 18-300mm
Focal Length: 18mm – Aperture: f/11 – Shutter Speed: 1/200  second – ISO: 100

There were quite a few fishermen lined up on the beach. The first photo makes them look really close together but they did have some separation between them.

Surf FishingFishermen in a row

The spotted seatrout, also known as speckled trout (Cynoscion nebulosus), is a common estuarine fish found in the southern United States along coasts of Gulf of Mexico and South Atlantic Ocean. While most of these fish are caught on shallow, grassy flats, spotted seatrout reside in virtually any inshore waters, from the surf of outside islands to far up coastal rivers, where they often come for shelter during cold weather. Contrary to its name, the spotted seatrout is not a member of the trout family (Salmonidae), but of the drum family (Sciaenidae). It is popular for commercial and especially recreational fishing in coastal waters of the southeastern United States. Adults reach 19-25 inches in length and 3-17 pounds in weight“. Source: Wikipedia:

Glad that you stopped by my self-project of a photo a day for 365 days. If this is your first time to my site and you wonder what this 365 days of photos is all about, click HERE to read the original post. Settings are added to the photos so that I can remember what I’ve used and can see if any future photos done with other settings turn out better or worse. Remember, this project is all about my learning more about photography.

Check out E-liz Treasures to see what my friend in Maine is doing with her daily photos.
Comments are always welcomed. I would love to hear from you.